Thursday, March 11, 2010

Rock Hill Presbyterian Church

The recent scare concerning the possible demolition of Rock Hill Presbyterian brought me back out to the church my family attended in the 1980's. Well, we didn't actually go to the Presbyterian services, but the services of the church that rented the church. Upon studying my pictures at home, I realized that the upper reaches of the church must have been replaced or added on to, as the stone does not match the lower courses of stonework. I like how the church looks like it could be in the Scottish Highlands.The church consists of two parts: an antebellum rock church rumored to have been built by slaves, and a 1950's Sunday School addition which has not aged gracefully.The coat of blue-gray paint slathered over the more recent addition has done little to hide the fact that it is in bad shape.Fairfax House I think has moved twice across Manchester Road; first from its original location to across the street from the church, and then a second time when it was moved back across Manchester a few years back.What's with that blue paint that's everywhere?


  1. Hi,
    Thanks for visiting and caring about these wonderful structures! As to the blue paint on Fairfax House, we executed a massive study which included hundreds of paint samples taken inside and out on this 170 year old house. We discovered one of the earliest exterior campaigns to be the vivid blue which now appears on three of the restored sides. It was professionally matched. See our website at
    Your observations are correct. The original church walls were increased in height in the 1930's by two feet after a roof fire.
    Donia Hunter, Fairfax Restoration Inc. Chair

  2. Thanks Donia; I think the blue paint looks great on Fairfax House; it doesn't look too hot on the church, unfortunately.


A Blog detailing the beauty of St. Louis architecture and the buildup of residue-or character-that accumulates over the course of time.